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minutes from now. until then a look at comments by u.s. army chief of staff general ray odierno. he said friday the greatest threat facing our nation is fiscal uncertainty and potential budget shortfalls. >> good morning, everyone. i'm mike owe hand lan and on behalf of peter singer and everyone else here at bookings, for the 21st century hearing on intelligence. we're welcome to have general ray odierno to speak in what could not be a more important week for american defense policy making. you're aware of budget challenges of the process and how these can affect our men and women in uniform and future military planning and current operations. no one could be a more distinguished and thoughtful person who discuss these matters than general odierno who i have great honor to know a dozen years now. he has been a friend of brookings and the a friend of the broader defense community and he has been a distinguished servant in our nation's military and our nation's defense throughout that period. he took the fourth infantry division to iraq and presided over its operations, directed its operat
to the u.s., it is very diverse. when that provision was passed there was concern was and diverse enough. since then it has become very diverse and these are adding 55,000 visas that are getting 8 million applications each year randomly allocated by computerized lottery. that is a somewhat odd way to set priorities. the commission said we should set priorities and we should deliver on them and the diversity visa program fell then and i think we would say now that it doesn't rise to that level of priority compared to the other priorities. >> the time of the gentleman has expired and recognize the gentleman from idaho for five minutes. >> thank you mr. chairman. i am excited that we are having this hearing. i think it's important to we modernize the immigration system. we agree we have a broken immigration system but we need to find a solution to the problems that we have by being fair. we need to be fair to the millions of americans that want to follow the rules law. we need to be fair to the millions of people that are waiting in line to come to the united states and i think we have to b
night this week while the u.s. senate is on presidents' day break, we are featuring booktv in prime time. tonight, the financial industry of what led to the crisis. >> all of that live tonight on c-span. >> from the very start we told the board that the approach we're going to take, which was pretty straightforward, and remember, we were sent there to sort of fix gm. that was the nation, is go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused. i brought the message we were going to design, build and sell the world's best vehicles. we're going to move quickly. we need your support, and we need your input. and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or didn't get in the weeds on how you build a car, but the bigger question of financing, morale, positioning marketing, that sort of thing. the board was very supportive of that. and we kept them informed and you know, we just took off. >> leading general motors through bankruptcy and a government bailout, former chairman and ceo ed whitacre on "american tu
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
republicans will finally allow a vote on the nomination of robert bacharach to the u.s. court of appeals for the tenth circuit. because of this filibuster, something that stopped robert bacharach way last year, a man who came out of the senate judiciary committee unanimously, all democrats, all republicans voting for him, the people of oklahoma, colorado, kansas, new mexico, utah and wyoming have been needlessly denied his services as a tenth circuit judge for seven months. now, the judicial vacancies have again risen to almost 90. we have dozens of judges that get blocked for month after month after month, and then the republicans finally allow a vote on it, it passed with 90 votes or 95 votes or 100 votes, but every time that happens, the federal courts have diminished. every time that's happened, aside from the fact that the people of america wonder what in heaven's name we're doing in this body, anything as foolish as that, but the courts, the federal courts are supposed to be so impartial and outside of politics, they appear to be mixed up in politics. how does anybody, from any of
's number-one priority will be taking care of our troops. he is a veterans' advocate with the u.s.o. and he's won the respect and admiration of veterans' groups, in addition he's won the support of an extraordinary array of former secretaries of defense, ambassadors and diplomats, senior retired military leaders and in particular, two former members of this body who appeared with him at his testimony, former senators warren and nunn. i believe that chuck hagel is the right man for the challenges, the fiscal challenges that will confront the department of defense. put aside sequester, which i dearly hope will not happen, secretary panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will w
't want. >> i'm a student of the kennedy school. do you have any plans on expanding beyond u.s., for instance, to europe? [inaudible] hasn't been very successful expanding to many european countries. thank you. >> yeah. we're looking -- international coverage is really interesting. i think that we're trying every single print issue of the magazine at least a couple times a week to always have international content be in the mix. so we've had reported pieces from venezuela, or we had someone who was embedded in the afghanistan. we ran a piece in the last two issues ago on that. so it's really important. the question for us from just a business standpoint is, um, the economics of it. more often than not it works for us, it works best for us to work with freelance reporters or who are contributing for us and luke, who i just mentioned contributes for "the new york times" as well, and so we can get the content, we can get the ideas in the magazine we don't have, you know, a bureau in paris or kabul or something, something like that. so, but the international stuff, i think, is key
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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